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“Thank-Yous” Every Father Should Hear

Editors Baltimore Times | 6/13/2013, 9:24 p.m.

If you’re searching for a meaningful Father’s Day gift, look no further: Todd Patkin shares eleven “thank-yous” that dads everywhere would love to hear.

Foxboro, MA— On Sunday, June 16, 2013— otherwise known as Father’s Day— dads around America will receive ties, tools and other “toys” from their children. Sure, those gifts (as well as cards, visits, and family meals) are a great way to let Pops know that you love him and that you’re glad he is part of your life. But according to Todd Patkin, as you and he get older, there is an even better way to honor your dad on Father’s Day: Tell him thank you and mean it.

“All parents are different, but one thing they have in common is that they want the best for their children,” says Patkin, author of Finding Happiness: One Man’s Quest to Beat Depression and Anxiety and— Finally— Let the Sunshine In (StepWise Press, 2011, ISBN: 978-0-9658261-9-8, $19.95, www.findinghappinessthebook.com). “As a father myself, I can tell you that while we all make mistakes from time to time, we genuinely do our best to help our kids to be capable, responsible and fulfilled adults.”

Because our parents tend to be such constant presences in our lives, says Patkin, we often take them— and everything they’ve done for us— for granted. Father’s Day is the perfect time to think about all of the ways in which your dad has impacted your life, and hopefully, give him the gift of heartfelt thanks.

“I know that stereotypically speaking, men aren’t supposed to be very ‘touchy-feely,’” Patkin admits. “But I promise you, when it comes to your kids, all of those rules go out the window. I cherish every ‘I love you,’ ‘thanks,’ and genuine smile I’ve ever gotten from my son. It’s incredibly heartwarming and fulfilling to hear directly from your child that he or she thinks you’ve done a good job as a parent.”

Here, Patkin shares eleven “thank-yous” that might just make your own dad’s Father’s Day perfect:

•Thank you for almost always making time to come to my games, concerts, and awards ceremonies. I know you were under pressure and busy a lot of the time, so your priorities taught me that family and relationships are always more important than work and outside achievements.

•Thank you for supporting me when I decided I’d rather be in the school band than play basketball. The fact that you clapped loudest at our concert let me know unequivocally that you love me for who I am— especially since you were the star point guard during your own high school days!

•Thank you for making me help with yard work and home improvement projects on the weekends. I may not have enjoyed it at the time, but you taught me the value of hard work. Because of you, I take pride in a job well done, no matter how large or small!

•Thank you for teaching me to ride a bike, and especially for encouraging me to get back up and try again when I fell. I learned that persistence and practice pay off, and that the results can be fantastic!