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Alzheimer’s Association presents African American memory loss forum

10/25/2013, 6 a.m.
The Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Maryland Chapter, will present the Ninth Annual Pythias A. and Virginia I. Jones African American Community ...

— The Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Maryland Chapter, will present the Ninth Annual Pythias A. and Virginia I. Jones African American Community Forum on Memory Loss, Saturday, November 2, 2013 from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Coppin State University located at 2500 W. North Avenue in Baltimore.

Occurring during “National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month,” the event is named in honor of the parents of State Senator Verna L. Jones-Rodwell, Ernestine Jones Jolivet, Alvin A. Jones, Pythias D. Jones, MD and the late Gilda Jones Garrett, who were affected by dementia.

Approximately 300 policy makers, sorority members, business leaders, health professionals and family caregivers are expected to attend the Forum, which will inform the community about memory loss, support caregivers, share the promise of research and advise on ways to get involved to help conquer this disease.

Michael Dorsey, a Baltimore County native who lost 136 pounds on NBC’s “The Biggest Loser,” will discuss his health battle with obesity and motivate audience members to make healthy changes in their own lives.

Majid Fotuhi, MD, Ph.D. (founder and Chief Medical Officer, NeurExpand Brain Center) will give a keynote presentation entitled,” Boost Your Brain.” FunDrum Rhythm Circles will lead caregivers in a stress-relieving, healing drumming circle, and breakout sessions will address behavior changes, community resources and legal planning.

The Forum also will feature health screenings, including dental health from the Baltimore City Health Department and nutrition from Registered Dietitian and Licensed Nutritionist Rona Martiyan.

Coppin State will provide blood pressure screenings, as African-Americans have a higher rate of vascular disease (diseases involving blood vessels, including heart attack and stroke)— one of the suspected risk factors of Alzheimer's disease.

Overall, more than 25,000 African-American Marylanders have Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder. Research suggests that the prevalence, incidence and cumulative risk of Alzheimer’s disease appear to be much higher in African-Americans.

Admission is free and includes continental breakfast and lunch. Registration is required to attend not later than Monday, October 28, 2013. To register or receive sponsorship information, call the Alzheimer’s Association at 410-561-9099 or visit: www.alz.org/maryland.