Quantcast

BMe leaders in Baltimore receive $10,000 for community-building efforts

7/28/2014, 6 a.m.
BMe Community has announced its selections for the 2014 BMe Leader Awards, aimed at providing recognition, funding and networking opportunities ...
Munir Bahar is the organizer of the 300 Man Movement, an anti-violence coalition that aims to reduce gun violence in Baltimore, and will use his 2014 BMe Leader Award to expand the COR Fitness facility and mentorship program. (Courtesy photo)

— BMe Community has announced its selections for the 2014 BMe Leader Awards, aimed at providing recognition, funding and networking opportunities to black men who take action to help build prosperous cities across the country.

The 2014 BMe Leaders are comprised of 30 men, 10 each from the three cities where BMe operates— Baltimore, Detroit and Philadelphia. In these cities, black men’s faces are often associated with the cities’ greatest challenges. BMe contends that if more people see the host of ways that inspired Black men bring out the best in the city, then these cities will have a better more accurate, more attractive image as well.

“The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is the ‘extra’ that brothers like these put into this city and the lives of its people. They’re everyday contributions make Baltimore an extraordinary place to live,” said BMe CEO and Founder Trabian Shorters.

“My grandfather was an ordinary man who did extraordinary good for anyone who knew him,” added Shorters. “I want to honor men like him. I want to be a man like him. So I started BMe so that we all have a chance to honor and engage the good in our communities and our cities.”

Each year, the BMe Leader Awards are presented with the notion that everyday black men should be acknowledged as assets, who regularly do something to improve the lives of others. They are owners, builders and doers who quietly make a substantial positive impact on society as a whole. Discounting their contributions makes the city itself seem less valuable.

Shorters remarks about the need for this type of actionable recognition, “If you’re trying to build a more prosperous Baltimore, you have to build upon the great assets of Baltimore. BMe men like these are all over Baltimore.

“The stories you tell yourself create the life that you’ll live. We must tell the true story of our city’s inspired, authentic Black men otherwise people might get the false impression they don’t exist.”

BMe began as an innovation of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and now operates as an independent entity with support from Knight Foundation, Open Society Foundation, and Skillman Foundation.

For more information about the 2014 BMe Baltimore Leaders program, please contact Rodney Foxworth at rodney@bmecommunity.org. Visit www.bmecommunity.org.