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Bromo Arts District hosts First World Congress of Missing Things

6/6/2014, 6 a.m.
A team of Austrian artists-in-residence in the Bromo Tower Arts District will hold a community-led placemaking exercise at the MTA ...

— A team of Austrian artists-in-residence in the Bromo Tower Arts District will hold a community-led placemaking exercise at the MTA station at Lexington Market located at 320 W Lexington Street in Baltimore City on Saturday, June 7 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The public is invited to submit and discuss their ideas about what’s missing or could be improved in their communities. A document containing these “missing things” will be presented to the Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake during a closing ceremony at 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 8, allowing the ideas to reach the highest levels of city government.

The World Congress of Missing Things is part of the TRANSIT: Creative Placemaking with Europe in Baltimore project, an initiative of the Washington, D.C. cluster of the European Union National Institutes for Culture and the Baltimore Office of Promotions & the Arts, supported by a grant from the European Union. The European culture institutes involved include Austrian Cultural Forum, British Council, Goethe-Institute, and the Embassy of Spain.

The Congress was conceived by renowned Austrian artist Barbara Holub and initiated by Anton Falkeis (Social Design, University of Applied Arts, Vienna) in conjunction with University of Applied Arts students Elisabeth Stephan, Marie-Christin Rissinger, Julian Verocai and Simone Klien. The congress is hosted and managed by the Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment, Inc.

The project is also supported by a grant from ArtPlace America, a collaboration of leading national and regional foundations, banks and federal agencies accelerating creative placemaking across the U.S. Additional support for the Congress is provided by the Maryland Transit Administration, the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and the Current Gallery.