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Baltimore County dedicates 1812 Home of the Brave Mural to honor citizen soldiers

9/12/2014, 9 a.m.
With members of the 1-175th Infantry Regiment Maryland National Guard filling Battle Acre Park in Dundalk, Baltimore County Executive Kevin ...
The "Home of the Brave" mural at Battle Acre Park in Dundalk (Courtesy Photo/Office of the Baltimore County Executive)

With members of the 1-175th Infantry Regiment Maryland National Guard filling Battle Acre Park in Dundalk, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz dedicated a new mural to commemorate Baltimore County's role in the War of 1812. The mural overlooks the newly renovated County park, which is on the site of the Battle of North Point, a crucial military engagement in which U.S. soldiers stalled British land forces so American troops could fortify Fort McHenry and save Baltimore from capture.

"Two hundred years ago, Baltimore County citizen soldiers defended our country in the War of 1812. This mural is a daily reminder of Dundalk's lasting contribution to our nation's history and of the important role each citizen can play," said Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. "We are honored to dedicate this mural to the citizen soldiers who continue to bravely serve our country."

The "Home of the Brave" mural features the Battle of North Point engagement, with American troops holding formation, blocking British troops from advancing toward Fort McHenry. This panel is flanked by portraits of the battle's military leaders, U.S. General John Stricker and British General Robert Ross. Another panel highlights the historic Todd's Inheritance homestead, showing rural life in eastern Baltimore County during the early 1800s. A final scene shows a celebration ceremony held in 1839, just 25 years after the Battle of North Point was waged on the site.

The "Home of the Brave" mural was designed and painted by artist Marshall Adams and is a project of the Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences in partnership with the Dundalk Renaissance Corporation. Funding was provided through grants from The Citizens of Baltimore County and the Maryland State Arts Council.