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Black folks need to stop drinking the ‘fool-aid’

James Clingman | 12/16/2016, 6 a.m.
The term “Drinking the Kool-Aid” has been taken to a new level among many of our people.
Jim Clingman says that while black folks have always had to deal with “so-called black leaders” these scoundrels, have been reluctant to call them out and to expose them for what they really are. Courtesy Photo/NNPA

— So, while the “Drinking the Kool-Aid” cliché has become sort of comical and caricature-oriented in its connotation, “Drinking the fool-aid” gives a much more enlightened description of the dangers that lurk in actualizing the phrase.

I contend that black folks are far too intelligent to be reduced to a bunch of voluntary “fool-aid” drinkers, lapping up every word spoken by anyone, without doing our homework and making sure that what they say is true and illustrated by their subsequent actions.

In other words, don’t believe everything you hear or read on the Internet. Don’t be a sycophant for a shyster or a puppet for a prevaricator. Hold their feet to the fire after they speak, and use your own discernment to ascertain the wealth of their words— or the lack thereof.

As Woodson intimated, black folks have authentic leaders who have “constructive programs,” but who are seldom followed. Unfortunately, we have more folks drinking the fool-aid of hucksters than we have those who refuse it or at least read the label before they are willing to take a drink, but to borrow a verse from Matthew 7:13 "…For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.”

Think for yourself, and be willing to accept the consequences thereof. Fool-aid may taste good, but it will make you very sick.

James Clingman is the nation’s most prolific writer about economic empowerment for black people. His latest book, “Black Dollars Matter! Teach Your Dollars How to Make More Sense,” is available at: Blackonomics.com.