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Yo-yo dieting dangerous for women's hearts, study says

Hailey Middlebrook | 11/18/2016, 6 a.m.
Yo-yo dieting may increase the risk for coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death in post-menopausal women, according to a ...
Yo-yo dieting may increase the risk for coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death in post-menopausal women, according to a study presented to the American Heart Association on Tuesday. Turner

— Yo-yo dieting may increase the risk for coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death in post-menopausal women, according to a study presented to the American Heart Association on Tuesday.

Although previous research focused on the heart risks associated with obesity, study leader Dr. Somwail Rasla of Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island questioned whether women with normal weights could be putting their hearts in danger by on-and-off dieting.

There's evidence that being overweight in midlife increases risk of dying from two types of heart disease, according to the heart association -- coronary heart disease, in which blood vessels are blocked by fat and other material, or sudden cardiac death, where the heart's electrical system suddenly stops working.

But it wasn't clear whether losing or gaining weight in adulthood increased the risk of death from those diseases.

"We wanted to know if weight cycling is clinically significant," Rasla said.

Does weight cycling effect our hearts?

To find the answer, researchers studied 153,063 post-menopausal women who self-reported their weights.

At the start of the study, women were asked to describe their weights as normal (with a body mass index less than 25), overweight (a BMI of 25 to 29.9) or obese (a BMI greater than 30). They also reported their adult weight histories, describing themselves as maintaining stable weight, steadily gaining weight, steadily losing weight or weight cycling (if they had lost and regained 10 pounds or more). Weight gained and lost during pregnancy didn't count as weight cycling, Rasla said.

Researchers followed the outcome of their participants for more than 11 years, recording fatalities due to coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death.

Over the course of the study, 2,526 coronary heart disease deaths and 83 sudden cardiac death deaths were recorded. Researchers categorized the deaths based on the women's starting weights and their weight histories over time.

For overweight and obese women, weight cycling was not associated with the risk of heart disease-related deaths.

But the most surprising findings came from the group of normal-weight women who confessed to weight cycling. They were 3½ times more likely to have sudden cardiac death than women with stable weights. Additionally, yo-yo dieting in normal-weight women was associated with a 66% increased risk of coronary heart disease deaths, according to the research.

"Normal-weight women who said 'yes' to weight cycling when they were younger had an increased risk of sudden cardiac death and increased risk of coronary heart disease, which can lead to heart attacks and other serious issues," Rasla said.

The frequency of weight cycling -- how often the women had lost and regained 10 pounds or more -- was also a risk factor. "The more cycling, the more hazardous (to their hearts)," Rasla explained.

The dangers of yo-yo dieting

Women are more likely to change their weight frequently: According to Rasla, 20% to 55% of the female population of the United States has admitted to weight cycling, while only 10% to 20% of men have. Though it's a common issue, the clinical significance of weight cycling isn't always agreed on.