Quantcast

BGE promotes STEM Education at Mergenthaler High School

Stacy M. Brown | 9/15/2017, 6 a.m.
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE) employees paid a visit to Mergenthaler High School on Hillen Road in the city ...
BGE employees visited Mergenthaler High School where they discussed careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) on Friday, September 8, 2017, as part of STEMtember, BGE’s series of “Welcome Back to School” activities throughout the month of September. BGE is committed to educating young people about careers in the energy industry— specifically, careers in STEM. BGE wants to ensure that students in the central Maryland service area are prepared for and aware of the possible future job opportunities that may await them within BGE. (Above) Students with swag bags they received from BGE with ear buds and a flash drive. Courtesy Photo/BGE

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE) employees paid a visit to Mergenthaler High School on Hillen Road in the city to push careers in science, technology, engineering and math— or STEM.

“BGE is committed to educating young people about careers in the energy industry,” Denise Galambos, vice president of human resources for BGE said in a statement issued by the company about its September 8 visit to the school commonly known as Mervo.

Students studying engineering, construction, computer-assisted design, and automotive technology were the focus of the event, which counts as part of BGE’s series of welcome back to school activities occurring throughout September.

The company refers to the activities as “STEMtember,” where they engage students with an emphasis on encouraging them in STEM fields.

“Careers in STEM offer exciting, innovative and challenging opportunities for students to pursue,” Galambos said. “We want to ensure that students in our central Maryland service area are prepared for and are aware of the possible future job opportunities that may await them within BGE.”

Several published reports recently noted that college graduates who focused on STEM fields would likely make the highest annual starting salaries.

A 2016 report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers noted that half the employers surveyed said they planned to hire graduates with bachelor's degrees in STEM fields, making them the most sought-after candidates entering the job market.

Engineers were expected to make an average of $64,891 right out of school— a three- percent increase over their projected earnings in 2015. Computer science majors, who were expected to take home $61,321, ranked a close second. Math and science majors trailed slightly with an average starting salary of $55,087.

Further, according to the report, engineers and computer scientists who graduated with master’s degrees in 2016 could have expected to earn the most money compared to their peers, with average starting salaries of $73,871 and $72,080, respectively.

“BGE’s engagement with students at Mergenthaler is just one of many efforts to provide mentoring and networking opportunities and other support for students throughout central Maryland,” Galambos said. “Among the many education-related programs that BGE supports are the BGE Scholars Program, which provides scholarships for qualifying college students, BGE’s Smart

Energy Interns Program, which provides summer job opportunities for qualifying students, and BGE’s Bright Ideas Program, which will launch [this month] and provide grants to teachers within BGE’s service area,” she said.

Other BGE or BGE-supported education programs include the Captain Mercaptan Natural Gas Safety Contest where winners receive up to $10,000; the Wires Down Video Challenge; the Kennedy Krieger therapeutic playground, which includes a $250,000 BGE grant; the National Association of Women in Construction, where students receive hands-on exposure to gas and electric construction work at BGE’s training center; and an ongoing gas and electric safety curriculum.

BGE’s sister utilities within the Exelon family also are highlighting STEM efforts as students across their respective service areas begin the new school year.